Celia Peterson

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BAALBECK, Lebanon: 16/02/2016: “The crisis, had a great impact on us, both men and women. Firstly, we lost a lot of our country’s men, and many women were widowed. I don’t think anyone in the whole world faced what we women did in Syria. We were the ones most affected. We are alone, some have lost their father, brother or husband. Her Husband, the house’s backbone is gone.”

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BAALBECK, Lebanon: 16/02/2016: “The crisis, had a great impact on us, both men and women. Firstly, we lost a lot of our country’s men, and many women were widowed. I don’t think anyone in the whole world faced what we women did in Syria. We were the ones most affected. We are alone, some have lost their father, brother or husband. Her Husband, the house’s backbone is gone.”

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Dubai, UAE - 16/11/2015: Portrait of a Kushti fighter.

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Video

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Abu Dhabi, UAE - 09/08/2016: A portrait of Brother Thomas Sebastian of the St Joseph's Catholic Church, Secretary to H.E. Bishop Paul Hinder, before he leads one of Friday's main prayers.

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Shajaya, Gaza, Palestine - 20/09/2014: Portrait of a Gazan woman inside her badly damaged house. She lost many family members in 'Operation Protective Edge', including her two grand children who went out to buy milk for the family and were both killed by shelling. 35 members of her extended family all lost their homes within one hour of intense bombing, in a neighbourhood that saw 60% of the buildings destroyed.

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Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: A young Dom girl in the Hayy Al Gharbeh area which houses a large number of the Lebanese and now Syrian Dom community.

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Bekaa Valley, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: 85 years old Sharifi had tattoos produced on her hands and face when she was 10. The Dom used to be famous for this but the new generation no longer practices this tradition. In Syria she lived in a tent with no chairs and moved into a concrete home when she was married at 15 years of age. She speaks Domari and is now living in a tented settlement in the Bekaa valley: “We had everything in Syria, now we have nothing. We are happy.”

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Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: 9 year old Hussein outside his home with his pet cat in the Hayy Al Gharbeh area. Hussein goes to a local education centre next door to his house to study. Many Dom children, despite having been granted Lebanese citizenship, struggle to gain entry to the public school system due to the effects of generational poverty and if they do go often leave because of the discrimination they face from other children.

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Jadra, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Ali in the living room of his home in Jadra.

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Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Khalil, 13 year's old in the Hayy Al Gharbeh area of Beirut.

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Bourj el Barajneh Camp, Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Marwa Ayoub, 19 years old from Akka works in a sweet shop in the camp. “My parents told me Palestine has beautiful homes, fields but we have forgotten our traditions, we have forgotten everything. I have seen the ancient ruins on video, I would love to see them myself, nobody is happy here.”

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Bourj el Barajneh Camp, Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Heyam Mahmoud, 54 years old, is from the city of Akka, has never lived in Palestine but her mother lived there until she was 9 year’s old and passed along some memories of her city: “Aaka is a beautiful city, the wall is so wide a car can drive on it and it separates the sea from the city. My grandfather used to go to Jazaar mosque and he took my uncle with him to pray. We brought nothing with us, nothing [here] reminds us of Palestine except our memories. We use these memories to apply them in our weddings and social gatherings.”

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Bourj el Barajneh Camp, Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Taha Issa, 78 years old, lived in Haifa for the first 9 years of his life but can hardly recall any memories from this period, finding it too painful to remember his early years in Palestine: “I can’t actually repeat things, maybe I remember but it’s been a long time, and to go back to memories is not easy.” He sometimes sees activities organized by various groups in the camps that remind him of Palestine.

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Dubai, UAE - 31/03/2015: A expatriate worker takes a break on the 2nd December Street.

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Gaza, Palestine - 10/07/2015: Prison officers at the Reform and Rehabilitation Centre for Women. Left to Right: Hanane, Umm Ahmed, Umm Suhaib, Umm Omar and Umm Mohamed.

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Gaza, Palestine - 10/07/2015: Amal Nofal, head of the women's prison in Gaza, known as the Reform and Rehabilitation Centre for Women.

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Beit Hanoun, Gaza, Palestine - 20/09/2014: A young girl awaits the arrival of water so she can fill up bottles for her family.

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Khan Younis, Gaza, Palestine - 20/09/2014: Khalid Rasheed Al Astal, a farmer from Khan Younis struggles with the salinity of water which impacts the quality and choice of crop. The lack of water and electricity means the farm works 24 hours a day just to water the crops.

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BAALBECK, Lebanon: 17/02/2016: Fatma Yahya from Damascus is 30 year’s old and is a Syrian refugee in Lebanon. She left Syria when the conflict started and is working as a hairdresser to support her husband and kids. Her husband is a refugee in Germany and she is hoping to join him with their family. Fatma stands outside her salon in Baalbeck. Fatma did various gender empowerment and leadership training with Action Aid: “the most important thing with the gender training is that I felt empowered, I am self-confident and at the same time I feel I can now support others. It’s important to have your own career and business, and not to wait for others to support you or give you aid. If I didn’t have this salon, my kids and I would be in a bad situation. I want to improve my skills and career, perhaps progress to a bigger salon.”

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BAALBECK, Lebanon: 17/02/2016: Fatma Yahya lives in Baalbeck, a conservative area in Lebanon. She finds men are not accepting of the new trend of Syrian women taking on more traditionally male roles but finds some of the more open minded men do accept it. “To be a successful woman is hard, I miss the time with my kids and my husband, I miss what they are doing at school and tracking their school work but I have to do this to survive.”

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Beit Hanoun, Gaza, Palestine - 20/09/2014: Kids in the streets of the Beit Hanoun area of Gaza, heavily bombed during the August 2014 war with Israel, codenamed 'Operation Protective Edge'.

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Dubai, UAE - 16/11/2015: Portrait of a Kushti fighter.

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Dubai, UAE - 16/11/2015: Mohamed Salwa, a Kushti fighter from Pakistan, followed his brothers to Dubai and is currently unemployed. He started Kushti 8 year's ago, got married, started a family and continued wrestling. He trains every morning and evening by running 2 kilometres and lifting weights.

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Dubai, UAE - 16/11/2015: Mohamed Salwa and Mohamed Nader, pose after showering with a hose pipe in a nearby wasteland after the fight.

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Gaza, Palestine - 10/09/2014: A young man looks out of his bombed house in Shajaya, Gaza.

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Reyhanli, Turkey - 15/05/2015: Portrait of two Syrian refugees who run a website highlighting regime atrocities in Syria.

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Reyhanli, Turkey - 15/05/2015: Ahmed Seflo, 18, media student, hoping to gain a place at a Turkish university, Reyhanli, Turkey.

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Reyhanli, Turkey - 15/05/2015: A Syrian refugee lives in a garage with no water or electricity.

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Bourj el Barajneh Camp, Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Zahwa Mohammad Ashwaque is 55 years old from Haifa but was born in Lebanon. “I was born in Lebanon, I have 5 children. Yes, a Palestinian who never saw Palestine, we were born in Lebanon, and we`re still in Lebanon. They say that Palestine is so beautiful, yes, priceless, they say it`s so beautiful, and so fine. We don’t know personally anything about it, and we never saw it.” “Only the abayas, the ‘official’ one, remind me of Palestine here.”

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Gaza, Palestine - 10/07/2015: Baby inside the prison with his mother who has been incarcerated for stealing, Reform and Rehabilitation Centre for Women. The group are in a Quran lecture, which Yasmine, one of the prison guards believes “good people go to mosques but these women do not know how to go to the mosques. They need help, they need somebody to guide them down the right path in their lives.”

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BAALBECK, Lebanon: 16/02/2016: “The crisis, had a great impact on us, both men and women. Firstly, we lost a lot of our country’s men, and many women were widowed. I don’t think anyone in the whole world faced what we women did in Syria. We were the ones most affected. We are alone, some have lost their father, brother or husband. Her Husband, the house’s backbone is gone.”

View caption

BAALBECK, Lebanon: 16/02/2016: “The crisis, had a great impact on us, both men and women. Firstly, we lost a lot of our country’s men, and many women were widowed. I don’t think anyone in the whole world faced what we women did in Syria. We were the ones most affected. We are alone, some have lost their father, brother or husband. Her Husband, the house’s backbone is gone.”

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Dubai, UAE - 16/11/2015: Portrait of a Kushti fighter.

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Video

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Abu Dhabi, UAE - 09/08/2016: A portrait of Brother Thomas Sebastian of the St Joseph's Catholic Church, Secretary to H.E. Bishop Paul Hinder, before he leads one of Friday's main prayers.

View caption

Shajaya, Gaza, Palestine - 20/09/2014: Portrait of a Gazan woman inside her badly damaged house. She lost many family members in 'Operation Protective Edge', including her two grand children who went out to buy milk for the family and were both killed by shelling. 35 members of her extended family all lost their homes within one hour of intense bombing, in a neighbourhood that saw 60% of the buildings destroyed.

View caption

Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: A young Dom girl in the Hayy Al Gharbeh area which houses a large number of the Lebanese and now Syrian Dom community.

View caption

Bekaa Valley, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: 85 years old Sharifi had tattoos produced on her hands and face when she was 10. The Dom used to be famous for this but the new generation no longer practices this tradition. In Syria she lived in a tent with no chairs and moved into a concrete home when she was married at 15 years of age. She speaks Domari and is now living in a tented settlement in the Bekaa valley: “We had everything in Syria, now we have nothing. We are happy.”

View caption

Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: 9 year old Hussein outside his home with his pet cat in the Hayy Al Gharbeh area. Hussein goes to a local education centre next door to his house to study. Many Dom children, despite having been granted Lebanese citizenship, struggle to gain entry to the public school system due to the effects of generational poverty and if they do go often leave because of the discrimination they face from other children.

View caption

Jadra, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Ali in the living room of his home in Jadra.

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Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Khalil, 13 year's old in the Hayy Al Gharbeh area of Beirut.

View caption

Bourj el Barajneh Camp, Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Marwa Ayoub, 19 years old from Akka works in a sweet shop in the camp. “My parents told me Palestine has beautiful homes, fields but we have forgotten our traditions, we have forgotten everything. I have seen the ancient ruins on video, I would love to see them myself, nobody is happy here.”

View caption

Bourj el Barajneh Camp, Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Heyam Mahmoud, 54 years old, is from the city of Akka, has never lived in Palestine but her mother lived there until she was 9 year’s old and passed along some memories of her city: “Aaka is a beautiful city, the wall is so wide a car can drive on it and it separates the sea from the city. My grandfather used to go to Jazaar mosque and he took my uncle with him to pray. We brought nothing with us, nothing [here] reminds us of Palestine except our memories. We use these memories to apply them in our weddings and social gatherings.”

View caption

Bourj el Barajneh Camp, Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Taha Issa, 78 years old, lived in Haifa for the first 9 years of his life but can hardly recall any memories from this period, finding it too painful to remember his early years in Palestine: “I can’t actually repeat things, maybe I remember but it’s been a long time, and to go back to memories is not easy.” He sometimes sees activities organized by various groups in the camps that remind him of Palestine.

View caption

Dubai, UAE - 31/03/2015: A expatriate worker takes a break on the 2nd December Street.

View caption

Gaza, Palestine - 10/07/2015: Prison officers at the Reform and Rehabilitation Centre for Women. Left to Right: Hanane, Umm Ahmed, Umm Suhaib, Umm Omar and Umm Mohamed.

View caption

Gaza, Palestine - 10/07/2015: Amal Nofal, head of the women's prison in Gaza, known as the Reform and Rehabilitation Centre for Women.

View caption

Beit Hanoun, Gaza, Palestine - 20/09/2014: A young girl awaits the arrival of water so she can fill up bottles for her family.

View caption

Khan Younis, Gaza, Palestine - 20/09/2014: Khalid Rasheed Al Astal, a farmer from Khan Younis struggles with the salinity of water which impacts the quality and choice of crop. The lack of water and electricity means the farm works 24 hours a day just to water the crops.

View caption

BAALBECK, Lebanon: 17/02/2016: Fatma Yahya from Damascus is 30 year’s old and is a Syrian refugee in Lebanon. She left Syria when the conflict started and is working as a hairdresser to support her husband and kids. Her husband is a refugee in Germany and she is hoping to join him with their family. Fatma stands outside her salon in Baalbeck. Fatma did various gender empowerment and leadership training with Action Aid: “the most important thing with the gender training is that I felt empowered, I am self-confident and at the same time I feel I can now support others. It’s important to have your own career and business, and not to wait for others to support you or give you aid. If I didn’t have this salon, my kids and I would be in a bad situation. I want to improve my skills and career, perhaps progress to a bigger salon.”

View caption

BAALBECK, Lebanon: 17/02/2016: Fatma Yahya lives in Baalbeck, a conservative area in Lebanon. She finds men are not accepting of the new trend of Syrian women taking on more traditionally male roles but finds some of the more open minded men do accept it. “To be a successful woman is hard, I miss the time with my kids and my husband, I miss what they are doing at school and tracking their school work but I have to do this to survive.”

View caption

Beit Hanoun, Gaza, Palestine - 20/09/2014: Kids in the streets of the Beit Hanoun area of Gaza, heavily bombed during the August 2014 war with Israel, codenamed 'Operation Protective Edge'.

View caption

Dubai, UAE - 16/11/2015: Portrait of a Kushti fighter.

View caption

Dubai, UAE - 16/11/2015: Mohamed Salwa, a Kushti fighter from Pakistan, followed his brothers to Dubai and is currently unemployed. He started Kushti 8 year's ago, got married, started a family and continued wrestling. He trains every morning and evening by running 2 kilometres and lifting weights.

View caption

Dubai, UAE - 16/11/2015: Mohamed Salwa and Mohamed Nader, pose after showering with a hose pipe in a nearby wasteland after the fight.

View caption

Gaza, Palestine - 10/09/2014: A young man looks out of his bombed house in Shajaya, Gaza.

View caption

Reyhanli, Turkey - 15/05/2015: Portrait of two Syrian refugees who run a website highlighting regime atrocities in Syria.

View caption

Reyhanli, Turkey - 15/05/2015: Ahmed Seflo, 18, media student, hoping to gain a place at a Turkish university, Reyhanli, Turkey.

View caption

Reyhanli, Turkey - 15/05/2015: A Syrian refugee lives in a garage with no water or electricity.

View caption

Bourj el Barajneh Camp, Beirut, Lebanon - 15/10/2016: Zahwa Mohammad Ashwaque is 55 years old from Haifa but was born in Lebanon. “I was born in Lebanon, I have 5 children. Yes, a Palestinian who never saw Palestine, we were born in Lebanon, and we`re still in Lebanon. They say that Palestine is so beautiful, yes, priceless, they say it`s so beautiful, and so fine. We don’t know personally anything about it, and we never saw it.” “Only the abayas, the ‘official’ one, remind me of Palestine here.”

View caption

Gaza, Palestine - 10/07/2015: Baby inside the prison with his mother who has been incarcerated for stealing, Reform and Rehabilitation Centre for Women. The group are in a Quran lecture, which Yasmine, one of the prison guards believes “good people go to mosques but these women do not know how to go to the mosques. They need help, they need somebody to guide them down the right path in their lives.”